UNIX invented it, BSD and Linux gave it to the world

Everything is a file is very successful paradigm in the UNIX/Linux communities which has allowed the kernel to simplify and uniformize how it uses devices which are exposed to the user as files. All files are treated as a bag of bytes. Reading/writing from a file is straightforward.

Besides actual data storage a lof ot fruitful exaptation has been derived from this paradigm and from the UNIX/Linux file system conventions:

  • Files, folders, symlinks, hardlinks, named pipes (fifo), network pipes, devices
  • Applications which handle readable files and can work together well (ex.: lines separated with \n, columns separated with \t): less/more, tail, head, sort, split, join, fold, par, grep, awk, colum, wc, sed, tee
  • Configuration management
  • Application storage
  • Library registry
  • Disk cloning
    • Disk images for backup (dd)
    • Smaller than disk size images (skip unused space)
    • Compress disk images on the fly without storing the uncompressed version (dd | gz)
    • Restoring disk images from backups
    • Disk recovery — HDDs, CDs, DVDs, USB sticks etc. — when they have bad sectors or scratches
    • Creating bootable USB sticks from a raw image file or an ISO (dd again)
  • Virtual filesystems
    • Mounting a raw image file or ISO as a filesystem
    • Mounting archives and compressed archives as a filesystem (tar, gz, bz, zip, rar)
    • Network filesystems look just like normal folders SAMBA, NFS
    • Using various network protocols as filesystems: HTTP, FTP, SSH
  • Searching everywhere (find, grep, sed)

Plan9 from Bell Labs made it better

Current UNIX/Linux distros don’t implement this paradigm fully — ex.: network devices aren’t files — but some less known systems do (such as UNIX successor plan9 / inferno and their Linux correspondent glendix).

The plan9 project went onward in applying the paradigm for:

  • Processes
    • Process management
    • Inter process communication
    • Client-Server network communication
  • Network related issues:
    • Network interfaces are files
    • Access rights to network interfaces is based on filesystem access rights to symlinks pointing to interface files
    • The filesystem (9P) extends over the network as a network communication protocol
  • Graphics interfaces and mouse IO

Other innovations it brought us (which got implemented in UNIX/Linux):

  • UTF-8 / Unicode
  • Filesystem snapshotting
  • Union filesystems
  • Lightweight threads
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